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Main’s Frog

Cyclorana maini

Main’s Frog
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Main’s Frog • Cyclorana maini

The tadpoles of the Mains Frog are fairly large, varying in colour from orange-gold, copper pink over a grey base, dense grey-gold or dull gold with dark speckling.1

Some environmental situations, such as the tadpoles living in a small amounts of water, which would naturally heat to higher temperatures, is known to trigger the tadpoles to develop at a faster rate, developing into adults frogs within 14 days.

This seemingly hurried lifecycle from egg to tadpole to adult frogs is a common feature of frogs from the arid and desert region, as water when it does fall is usually only around for a brief period. Nowhere is it more evident then seeing a former pool of water, drying out, still filled with tadpoles that did not grow quick enough to complete their lifecycle.

Main’s Frog Tadpoles • Images

Images from Palm Valley, Finke Gorge National Park
Tadpoles at Palm Valley (Finke Gorge National Park)

Tadpoles (with developing rear limbs) at Palm Valley (Finke Gorge National Park)

Tadpoles (with developing limbs) at Palm Valley (Finke Gorge National Park)

Tadpoles (with developing rear limbs) at Palm Valley (Finke Gorge National Park)

Tadpoles (with developing rear limbs) at Palm Valley (Finke Gorge National Park)

© Colin Leel

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