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Wollumbin / Mount Warning National Park

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Wollumbin / Mount Warning National Park - Cities, Towns and Localities
As the Southern Hemisphere’s largest extinct shield volcano and towering 1,157 metres above sea level, Mount Warning strikes an imposing feature over the surrounding region. Located at the heart of the Mount Warning National Park, Mount Warning is the remnant central plug of the Tweed shield volcano, with the ‘Tweed Caldera’ being one of the largest and best examples of an erosion caldera in the world.1

Bundjalung People
Mount Warning is known by the name of ‘Wollumbin’ by the Bundjalung People, who were here long before European settlement. ‘Wollumbin’ was and remains a place of cultural and traditional significance, being the site of certain ceremonies and initiation rites. It is part of this tradition and culture that forbids the uninitiated from climbing the mountain, and as such the Bundjalung ask that you consider choosing not to climb the mountain. This request is also made on the Mount Warning National Park section of the NSW national parks website.

The name Wollumbin is said to mean ‘cloud catcher’.2, 3

There is a Bundjalung Dreamtime story of Wollumbin, that tells us about the Warrior Chief of the mountain. The Bundjalung people believe the spirits of the mountains were warriors and the wounds they received in battle can be seen as scars on the side of the mountain. The dreamtime story reveals that the thunder and lightning are the results of their battles. It is also revealed that when you look toward Wollumbin from the north, you can see the face of the Warrior Chief in the mountain’s outline.4

European History
On the 15-16 May, 1770, history shows Lieutenant James Cook as the first European to record seeing “...this point I named Cape Byron... ...it may be known by a remarkable sharp peaked Mountain lying inland...”1 and “...there situation may always be found by the peaked mountain before mentioned... ...I have named Mount Warning...”5

A few hours later, whilst sailing north, Cook encountered the dangerous reefs that run 3 miles to the east from Fingal Head, known today as Danger Reefs, forcing him to change course to the east “...The point off which these shoals lay I have named Point Danger...”6

World Heritage
Mount Warning was added to the World Heritage list in 1975, forming part of the ‘Gondwana Rainforest of Australia’, a chain of more than 50 rainforest reserves spread along NSW north-east and Queensland south-east coastal escarpment, that include the Barrington Tops, New England, Wollumbin and Lamington National Parks. These areas were given World Heritage status because of the huge variety of flora and fauna contained within the ancient and isolated remnants of rainforest. 7

Facilities & Activities
The national park provides picnic and barbeque facilities at the Korrumbyn picnic area.

The Summit Walk is a hard 9 km, taking approximately 5 hours. Out of respect to the Bundjalung law and culture, the Bundjalung people ask that you consider choosing not to climb Mount Warning. If you do climb, please see the Mount Warning National Park section of the NSW national parks website.

As an alternative to the Summit Walk, there is an enjoyable stroll along the 200 m Lyrebird Track, or a picnic at the Korrumbyn picnic area.

Car-based and caravan camping are available at a privately run caravan park in the area.

There are also a number of accommodation options in nearby localities including:

Check out our listing of Mount Warning accommodation. In addition to our listed online travel guide information, contact the local tourism visitor centre for your destination for more attractions, tours, local maps and other information.

Information Centre

NSW Parks and Wildlife Service - Murwillumbah / Tweed Region
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Mount Warning National Park Other Links

• Mount Warning National Park Community/Local Government Links
• Mount Warning National Park Community Links

Source:
1 NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water: Mount Warning National Park - Plants, animals and landscape. Retrieved October 10, 2009.
2 Australian Heritage: The Wollumbin Calder: Realm of the Cloud Catcher (archived). Retrieved October 10, 2009.
3 Queensland Government Parks and Forests: Lamington National Park - Albert River Circuit ‘extract: Panoramic views of Mount Wagawn, Mount Durigan and the Tweed Range can be seen from here. These peaks are all part of the erosion caldera that surrounds Mount Warning, once a central volcanic plug. Traditional owners of the Bungalang language group call this mighty plug Wollumbin (Cloud-catcher).’ Retrieved October 10, 2009.
4 Australian Government Culture Portal: Crossing the Great Dividing Range — surveying an ancient land. Retrieved October 10, 2009.
5 Transcription of National Library of Australia, Manuscript 1 page 237, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
Cook's Journal: Daily Entries: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-jrnl-cook-17700515
6 Transcription of National Library of Australia, Manuscript 1 page 237, 2004
Published by South Seas, using the Web Academic Resource Publisher
Cook's Journal: Daily Entries: http://nla.gov.au/nla.cs-ss-jrnl-cook-17700516
7 NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water: Mount Warning National Park - World Heritage. Retrieved October 10, 2009.
 
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