AusEmade logo
Home • Accommodation • Attractions • Tours • Links • Resources • Transport • Insurance • Travel Articles • Aboriginal Tourism

Travel Australia with AusEmade

ACT • NSW • NT • QLD • SA • TAS • VIC • WA

Africa • Americas • Asia • Eurasia • Europe • Middle East • Oceania

Wales Attractions

United Kingdom

International Travel / Overseas Tourism Destination

Welcome to our holiday travel guide information for Wales. With its moorlands and mountain ranges, steep river gorges, waterfalls, valleys, lakes, estuaries, coastline and sandy beaches, Wales also has over 50 islands that lie off the Welsh mainland.

As well as the natural beauty, Wales is steeped in history with many old public houses and inns, as well as castle seeming to appear on every corner.

Over time we will be expanding our listing of wonderful attractions in Wales, in the meantime you can check out our current listing. If you want to include other great Welsh attraction, just send us an email with the details, including website (if applicable) and any images that you can provide permission for us to use here.

Wales • Attractions

Castles
• With over 600 castles, abbeys and holy wells, it is no surprise that there appear to be a castles on every corner. Some of the most popular castles include Caernarfon Castle, Conwy Castle, Harlech Castle, Pembroke Castle and Penrhyn Castle.

There is a great website ‘Castles of Wales’ with information and images about castles in Wales by Jeffrey L. Thomas.

Also visit the Cadw Welsh Government website, follow the link to Places to Visit and select a monument from the drop down list, or enter Castle as a keyword search.
National Museum Wales
• For those who love exploring museums, Wales have a number of interesting institutions including:
  • National Museum Cardiff
    — Discover art, archaeology, natural history and geology. Check out our busy programme of exhibitions and events
  • St Fagans: National History Museum
    — St Fagans is one of Europe's foremost open-air museums and Wales's most popular heritage attraction.
  • Big Pit: National Coal Museum
    — Big Pit is a real coal mine and one of Britain's leading mining museums. With facilities to educate and entertain all ages, Big Pit is an exciting and informative day out.
  • National Wool Museum
    — Located in the historic former Cambrian Mills, the Museum is a special place with a spellbinding story to tell.
  • National Roman Legion Museum
    — In AD 75, the Romans built a fortress at Caerleon that would guard the region for over 200 years. Today at the National Roman Legion Museum you can learn what made the Romans a formidable force and how life wouldn't be the same without them.
  • National Slate Museum
    — The National Slate Museum offers a day full of enjoyment and education in a dramatically beautiful landscape on the shores of Llyn Padarn.
  • National Waterfront Museum
    — The National Waterfront Museum at Swansea tells the story of industry and innovation in Wales, now and over the last 300 years.
  • Rhagor: Explore Our Collections
    — Rhagor (Welsh for ‘more’) offers unprecedented access to the amazing stories that lie behind our collections.

National Parks
• There are 3 national parks in Wales:
National Trails
• National Trails are long distance routes for walking, cycling and horse riding through the finest landscapes in England and Wales. In Scotland the equivalent trails are called long distance routes. There are 15 Trails in England and Wales (when complete 2 of these will be suitable for use by horse riders and cyclists along their entire length) and 4 in Scotland.

National Trails pass through some of the most stunning and diverse landscapes in Britain. There is something to suit everyone, from short walks to a 630 mile adventure.

The trails listed for Wales include Pembrokeshire Coast Path, Glyndŵr's Way, Offa's Dyke Path.
Back to Top
• Mid Wales Attractions
Hay-on-Wye
• Croeso i'r Gelli (Welcome to Hay-on-Wye) — World renowned as ‘The Town of Books’, this is a must visit destination for book lovers.

Famous for its second-hand and antiquarian bookshops, it has become the world's largest secondhand and antiquarian book centre. At time of writing, there are thirty major bookshops in the town, some specialising whilst others carry general stock. The larger bookshops are open 363 days a year and during the summer, stay open until late evening. A list of booksellers is available at the Tourist Information Bureau, Hay-on-Wye.

The annual Hay Festival is held during May/June (see website for dates).

Hay-on-Wye is located on the Welsh / English border in the County of POWYS, Wales. Whilst most of the town lies within Wales, some eastern parts encroach into England. The town is, nonetheless, considered to be in Wales.
Unusual Events • Green Events
• Back in 1979 the Tourist Association of Llanwrtyd Wells was started to enhance the local economy by marketing unique events within the town and surrounding area. The prime objective was to organise a new event each year. Green Events Ltd was conceived following the first ever Man versus Horse Marathon in 1980, followed by The Welsh National Four Day Walks in 1981 and the Drovers Walk in 1982. Twelve unusual events that could not fit into "main stream" are now part of the Llanwrtyd persona.

So, brace yourself for Bog Snorkelling, how about the challenge of Man versus Horse, enjoy a social weekend at the Real Ale Wobble, savour the tradition of the Mari LLwyd or the delight of the Roman Feast at the Saturnalia and test out our 'Bike- Chariots'. See the website for more details.
Back to Top
• North Wales Attractions
Bryn Celli Ddu Burial Chamber
• Llanddaniel Fab, Anglesey, North Wales
• Bryn Celli Ddu (the mound in a dark grove) is the best passage grave in Wales. The entrance to the burial chamber is through a 20 foot long passageway. Located near the village of Llanddaniel Fab and close to the Menai Strait on the Isle of Anglesey. This burial chamber is one of Anglesey's most important ancient monuments, dating circa 3000 years BC.
Snowdonia National Park
• One of Britain's breathing spaces — Covering some 823 square miles of diverse landscapes, Snowdonia National Park is one of those popular destinations attracting millions of people every year. The Welsh name for the National Park is Eryri (The Highland). There are nine mountain ranges that cover approximately 54% of the park, many of the peaks are over 915 metres, including the tallest in Wales and England, Yr Wyddfa (Snowdon) at 1,085 metres in height.

Hafod Eryri, the new summit building on Yr Wyddfa (Snowdon) was opened in June 2009, the terminus for the Snowdon Mountain Railway, and providing not only a ‘window on the world’, but also interpretation display of the mountain and its history, refreshment facilities and toilets.

Snowdonia also has the largest natural lake in Wales, combine this with its steep river gorges, waterfalls, valleys, estuaries and 23 miles of coastline and sandy beaches, you can see why the park is a popular tourism destination, lured by the beauty and diversity of landscape.
Hay-on-Wye
• Croeso i'r Gelli (Welcome to Hay-on-Wye) — World renowned as ‘The Town of Books’, this is a must visit destination for book lovers.

Famous for its second-hand and antiquarian bookshops, it has become the world's largest secondhand and antiquarian book centre. At time of writing, there are thirty major bookshops in the town, some specialising whilst others carry general stock. The larger bookshops are open 363 days a year and during the summer, stay open until late evening. A list of booksellers is available at the Tourist Information Bureau, Hay-on-Wye.

The annual Hay Festival is held during May/June (see website for dates).

Hay-on-Wye is located on the Welsh / English border in the County of POWYS, Wales. Whilst most of the town lies within Wales, some eastern parts encroach into England. The town is, nonetheless, considered to be in Wales.
Portmeirion
• The tourist village of Portmeirion in Gwynedd, North Wales, is one of Wales’ premier visitor attractions, welcoming 250,000 visitors every year. Built in the style of an Italian village, Portmeirion has been the location for numerous films and television shows, the most famous being the 1960s show The Prisoner.

With free parking, complimentary guided tours and audio visual show, six cafes and restaurants, half a dozen shops, gardens and beaches it is the perfect day out for all the family. Surrounding the village are 70 acres of exotic woodlands with easy to follow woodland trails and coastal walks.

Portmeirion is open every day of the year, see the website for details.
Back to Top
• South Wales Attractions
Cardiff • Caerdydd
• As the capital and largest city in Wales, Cardiff is the chief commercial centre for Wales, as well as the base for many of the national cultural and sporting institutions and events. Cardiff offers some great attractions, sports, culture, top class entertainment and shopping.

Visitors coming from London can take the train or by car. There are good motorway and road connections from England, the M4, M50, A5, just to name some of them. Cardiff International Airport is Wales only major airport.

A great way to experience Cardiff and the surrounding area is through a guided tour. Check out the official visitors' website for Cardiff.
National Museum Cardiff • Amgueddfa Genedlaethol Caerdydd
• Situated in the heart of Cardiff's civic centre, visitors can discover art, archaeology, natural history and geology. With a busy programme of exhibitions and events, we have something to amaze everyone, whatever your interest – and admission is free!
Back to Top
• West Wales Attractions
Pembrokeshire Coast National Park
• As Britain’s only truly coastal National Park, boasting some of the most spectacular scenery and diverse wildlife in Britain, Pembrokeshire Coast National Park offers a  wealth of wonderful places to explore and enjoy. Its stunning coastline offers safe, sandy beaches ideal for families, as well as rugged cliffs and secluded rocky coves. It's a paradise for the wildlife enthusiast, internationally important for its rare habitats and species and offshore lie Pembrokeshire's unique islands, each with their own special character. The park covers some 240 sq miles (620 sq km) of spectacular landscape around Wales’ south-western shore.

The area's fascinating past is ever-present in prehistoric tombs, Celtic crosses, Iron Age Hill Forts, Norman castles, medieval churches, Victorian forts and historic towns and villages.

The National Park Authority runs Visitor Centres in Tenby, Newport and Oriel y Parc Gallery and Visitor Centre in St Davids. We also own and run Carew Castle and Tidal Mill and Castell Henllys Iron Age Hill Fort.
 
Back to Top
 AusEmade Pty Ltd
 ABN 53 091 811 068
Advertise | Free Listing | Contact ฉ 2001-2015 
Privacy | Disclaimer | Copyright